Phishing Attack Fixes

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There is a phishing attack that affects Google Chrome, Opera, and Mozilla Firefox. Trusted sites are spoofed to make malicious domains look like the real ones. Check this website for more technical info. A phishing attack happens when an attacker/hacker sends you a link in an email that directs you to a malicious website. Just visiting the website might infect your computer with malware or it may trick you into typing in using your credentials or other personal info like credit card number or email passwords. With everything typed in, the attacker now has your information.

How can we prevent this?

1a. Update Google Chrome. Google has released an update to Chrome to address this issue. Your Chrome version should be 58.0.3029.81. On your Chrome browser, click the three dots found on the upper right corner and select Settings. In the Settings page, click About and Chrome will start updating itself. If the browser cannot update, use Firefox instead and apply the fix described in 1b.

1b. Apply fix for Firefox. Open a new tab in Firefox and type in about:config. Click the “I accept the risk!” button. In the search box, type in the word punycode. A result that shows network.IDN_show_punycode should appear. Double click it to change the last value from False to True.

2. If you receive links in emails, do not click them immediately. Make sure that you know the person who sent you the email or you’re expecting an email from that person. Check also the sender’s email address in the From field. It’s expected that the email address should be something like username@gmail.com or username@yahoo.com. Compare the username too. If it looks like a3nguillo@gmail.com or something like that, delete the email immediately.

3. Check the status bar of your browser as you hover the link. Make sure you did 1a and 1b. Place your mouse on the link but don’t click. Then check your browser’s status bar on the lower left portion of the screen. If the format of the site address looks different from other websites’ site address, don’t click the link.

4. Make sure your antivirus and anti-malware are updated. If you’ve accidentally clicked the link, they will intercept or prevent any malware that could enter your system.

There’s no fix yet for the Opera browser. Apply the suggested fixes and practices and help spread the word.

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Flash Player for Fedora x86_64 Architecture

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If you’re using an x86_64 architecture of Fedora, and having problems with Flash player installation for Firefox, follow this quick tutorial.

Flash Player

Flash Player

1. (This is optional) If you’ve tried installing Flash on your system, remove it first. Include nspluginwrapper too.
[root@hostname username]# yum erase flash-plugin nspluginwrapper*

2a. Install the rpm package for 64-bit plugin created by Leigh Scott.
[root@hostname username]# rpm -Uvh http://www.linux-ati-drivers.homecall.co.uk/flash.x86_64/flash-release-1-2.noarch.rpm

2b. You may also download the rpm package and install it from your downloaded directory. Assuming that the file is in your Downloads folder:
[root@hostname username]# rpm -Uvh /home/username/Downloads/flash-release-1-2.noarch.rpm

3. Install the plugin using yum.
[root@hostname username]# yum install flash-plugin

Check if Flash player is installed. This rpm works for Firefox and Opera and from Fedora 12 or newer.

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