Twitter’s 1935 Version

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In the mid-30’s, a robot message carrier was introduced in London, England. It was called “The Notificator”.

The Notificator

The Notificator

The machine is installed in streets and other public places where individuals may leave messages for friends like informing them of their  whereabouts or making or canceling of appointments.

In front of the machine, the user writes his message on a continuous strip of paper and drops a coin in the slot. The message then moves up behind the glass panel and remains in public view for two hours.

Today, there’s a web-based notificator. All you have to do is type in a twitter user’s username and click the Notificate button. You’ll be given a twitter search result on what the user’s been up to.

Source:
Modern Mechanix

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Pentium

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Pentium

Pentium

After the 486, Intel decided to have a new naming scheme for its fifth generation processor. Instead of naming it as the 586, they called it Pentium. The name was taken from the Greek word “penta” and ended with the Latin “-ium” which meant “five”.

Here’s a great article from the Maximum PC website about the history of the CPU.

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Intel

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intel

Bob Noyce and Gordon Moore wanted to name their new company ‘Moore Noyce’ but that was already trademarked by a hotel chain, so they had to settle for an acronym of INTegrated ELectronics.

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